1. The Fiske Family
2. The Bennetts
3. The Dicksons
4. The Abbey
5. Landmarks and Personalities
6. The Great Road
7. The South Side
8. Merriams and Fields
9. Sold to Riley
10. Early Automobiles
11. The Dump
 
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Wayland Mass rentals
 

EARLY AUTOMOBILES

 

summertime was always a problem. The most dramatic instance occurred at the top of Mount Wachusett. It was a hot summer  day, and by the time we reached the summit the radiator was growling so furiously that Eddie Green had us all stand at a safe distance while he untwisted the cap little by little, using a rag to protect his hand. He worked at arms length and stood poised for   a quick escape once action began. Suddenly he jumped aside as the cap flew high into the air and great volumes of rusty water spurted out like a geyser.
   Our next automobile was a Peerless limousine with an electric  self starter — a novelty with us. Our other automobiles were all hand-cranked, except the Chalmers which had a compressed air starter. The Peerless had also belonged to the Pushees. Like the Fiat its motion irritated Mrs. Pushee's gallstones, and they owned   it for less than a year before turning it in for something else. It     was an ark of an automobile with a telephone by the back seat     so the passenger could communicate with the driver, and there    was enough headroom inside for a moderately tall person to   stand. Our garage ceiling was too low for it, and had to be raised, and higher doors were installed at the same time. The Peerless could not have been as top-heavy as it looked; otherwise it    would have upset many times with the rugged use it got. It     served us for many years and, road conditions permitting, made daily trips to Boston to take Mary and me and a few others from Weston in to school. The front seat was open to the breezes on either side and an unpleasant place on cold mornings. My father always sat beside the driver, bundled up in several overcoats and   a cape, and by the time we got to Boston there were icicles  hanging from his beard.

 

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