1. The Fiske Family
2. The Bennetts
3. The Dicksons
4. The Abbey
5. Landmarks and Personalities
6. The Great Road
7. The South Side
8. Merriams and Fields
9. Sold to Riley
10. Early Automobiles
11. The Dump
 
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THE BENNETTS

 

house. Uncle Gus also taught me how to sail and when I went sail-ing I had to have a rope fastened around my middle with the other end secured to the mast or to a cleat. The modern life jacket had not been invented and non-swimmers bathed with water wings which were mouth inflated, and airtight only when wet.
   The Fiske house stood a little back from a high cliff over-  looking Buzzards Bay. Early one morning when I was about ten      I walked to the edge of the cliff with Uncle Gus. The grass was covered with a heavy dew, and Uncle Gus told me to take as long steps as I could — that way my feet would get less wet. I am not sure how sound a theory this is but ever since then I have always given it the benefit of the doubt !
   One summer Uncle Gus decided to move his boathouse up    from the beach and attach it to his own house to make a play- room for the children. It was roped to the top of the cliff in  sections, and as soon as the carpenters had nailed them together and got the roof in place, several of us begged Aunt Esther to let  us spend the night in the new wing. She answered us with a firm "no" and we thought she was being extremely mean. In the       small hours of the morning the whole household was awakened    by an earsplitting crash. The temporary supports had given away and the boathouse lay flat as a pancake. At last we were able to appreciate Aunt Esther's good judgment.
   Once when I was visiting the Fiskes in their winter house in Providence, Uncle Gus said he would take me to a wonderful  store and buy me any one thing I wanted in it. I had visions of a   toy automobile or a train but when I looked over the merchan-  dise I found it disappointing. Those were the days when Wool-worth's most expensive item cost a dime !

 

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