1. The Fiske Family
2. The Bennetts
3. The Dicksons
4. The Abbey
5. Landmarks and Personalities
6. The Great Road
7. The South Side
8. Merriams and Fields
9. Sold to Riley
10. Early Automobiles
11. The Dump
 
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THE DICKSONS

 

   Even as she grew older her determination never faltered. Dur-  ing World War II, if she happened to be late for a bus, and she often was, she drove as fast as she could until she had overtaken   it, forced it to the side of the road and climbed aboard. As far as    I know the bus drivers were more amused than angry, which was just as well because any dressing down would have gone in one  ear and out the other.
   My parents had seven children — Mary, myself, Teddy, Anna, Edward, Bill and Ruth, but as Mary died before Ruth was born   we were essentially six. Living as we did in a rather remote lo-cation, we had to use native ingenuity in contriving our various forms of amusement. One of my very early recollections is       being pushed down the back stairs by Mary, a painful experience that called for vengeance at the earliest opportunity; and so it    went until Teddy was old enough to become the victim.
   Our back stairs were perfectly straight with a door into the kitchen at the bottom. Whenever we got a new cook, we broke  her in by letting several dozen golf balls loose at the top of the  stairs all at once. Their impact on the closed door was enough to scare any unsuspecting person out of her wits.
   Another amusement was to play games in the night. The  children's wing of our house went off at an angle from the main  part, and my parents at one end could look across to our rooms   at the other. However, they were sound sleepers, and we could usually pull down our shades and turn on the lights in the small hours without being detected, and indulge in various antics such    as checkers, cards or perhaps a treasure hunt. We moved about  on tiptoe, never raising our voices above a whisper and making every effort not to get into each other's hair and stir up a rumpus.

 

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