1. The Fiske Family
2. The Bennetts
3. The Dicksons
4. The Abbey
5. Landmarks and Personalities
6. The Great Road
7. The South Side
8. Merriams and Fields
9. Sold to Riley
10. Early Automobiles
11. The Dump
 
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Shown by Great Estate your source for property in Wellesley.
 

THE ABBEY

 

night the police caught some boys in the act. The lawyer repre-senting the miscreants telephoned me to see how strongly I felt about the transgression. Well, — if a prominent citizen like my father did that sort of thing, what could I say?
   Ours was a remote section of town. Going north on Highland Street the nearest house, except for our farmhouse, was about a quarter of a mile away. It belonged to General Paine, and was  used only in the spring and fall until the John Paine family  winterized it and moved there in 1916.
   When I was old enough to go to school I became increasingly conscious of the remoteness of our place, especially with no neighborhood children my age to play with. Perhaps this was  driven home hardest one winter afternoon, when I was walking away from Winsor's skating pond with Helen Paine, who later became my wife. I pointed at a large house and asked, "Whose     is that big house with the red roof?"
   "The Blake's, silly," was her scornful reply. "You live so far   away from things you don't know anyone."
   This remark hurt and when, a few years later, I learned that     she and her family were moving into her grandfather's house a  single thought crossed my mind — "I wonder how she's going to like it — living so far away from everything."
   Going south on Highland Street there was better than a mile       of uninhabited country, except for the Nolte's camp, a long way   off the road and used only in summer. This section, notwithstand-ing a sinister aspect which I shall describe later, offered a variety   of scenery and was ideal for anyone who wanted to take a walk    in the quiet of the country. From the high pastureland at the       crest of the hill you could see Mt. Wachusett, Mt. Monadnock,

 

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